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Homeward Bound

Heather Lee Lommori, Sales Director, Engaged Nation

Homeward Bound

Heather Lee Lommori was so averse to the idea of working from home when Covid-19 forced a shutdown everywhere, she resisted at first. But the director of sales for Engaged Nation got with the program and it was like tasting a recipe you refused to try for years and wondering what took so long.

“Working from home was one of those ‘you don’t know what you’re missing’ kind of experiences,” says Lommori, a native Nevadan, born and raised in Reno. “I didn’t think I would like it, but this has been such a wonderful transition for me. Now I love it and couldn’t imagine going back to an office every day.”

A criminal justice and psychology major at the University of Nevada, Reno, Lommori wanted to be in law enforcement, something at the federal level.

“However, during my first year of grad school, I became a single mom during challenging economic times and had to leave the program to work full-time,” she says.

She took a job at bank and a second waiting tables. A gaming job came almost by accident. “I applied for a sales position at Atrient before I knew what it was or what I would be selling.”

Call it love at first sight. She knew the gaming industry was where she belonged. Seeking to advance her career, Lommori applied for an open sales director position at Engaged Nation.

“I was attracted to the company culture. I loved their philosophy of being more than a vendor to casinos and how they embraced the role of being good partners.”

It’s a philosophy Lommori tries to embody. “It’s been a great fit so far.”

At Engaged Nation, Lommori handles sales, promotions, email and text services nationwide.

“I am involved in all phases of the sale, from lead generation to contract negotiation,” she says. “I also assist with the planning and execution of trade shows.”

While Covid has had its ups and downs for Lommori, she’s focused on the positive. For one thing, she got to return to Reno, which turned out to be a godsend to Lommori and her family.

You might say Covid was just another obstacle to overcome.

“I am a firm believer in prayer and meditation, so I lean heavily on these practices for guidance and perspective,” says Lommori, who relaxes by meditating and exercising.

Lommori has also relied on colleagues for advice during her journey, those who have been there and helped her work through the challenges.

“Angela Ahmet, senior vice president, was my boss at Atrient, and then at Everi after the acquisition. She taught me about gaming and encouraged me to join Global Gaming Women. She groomed me into who I am today,” she says.

Mick Ingersoll, vice president, sales operations at Everi, was not only a colleague but a close friend.

“He has pushed me to exceed and be the best version of myself at every stage of my career,” she explains. “I owe him much of this accomplishment.”

If she could meet her younger self after all these years, she’d tell her, “Don’t sweat the small stuff. And enjoy the ride. Gaming is a fun and exciting industry. Don’t lose sight of that.”

Bill Sokolic is a veteran journalist who has covered gaming and tourism for more than 25 years as a staff writer and freelancer with various publications and wire services. He's also written stories for news, entertainment, features, and business. He co-authored Atlantic City Revisited, a pictorial history of the resort.

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