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GameCo Approved for Nevada License

GameCo Approved for Nevada License

GameCo LLC, the New York-based startup that is one of the pioneers of skill-based games for the slot floor, received final approval for its Nevada license, when the Nevada Gaming Commission voted 3-0 to confirm the recommendation for licensing previously issued by the Nevada Gaming Control Board.

GameCo first launched its arcade-style, skill-based “Video Game Gambling Machines” in Atlantic City, where Caesars casinos and the Tropicana have placed various versions of its games over the past two years.

At the licensing hearing, Gaming Commission Chairman Tony Alamo praised the arrival of skill-based gaming in Nevada, while conceding the games have had mixed results. “I’m very excited about this that eventually, hopefully when I’m long done with this commission, I’ll be able to walk into a hotel-casino and see an entire area where I’m going to recognize some of these games and play them and gamble at the same time,” Alamo said. “I always thought this was going to blow up, but I’m a little disappointed that it’s not blowing up, not just with you but with your competitors. I’m just not seeing the products coming.”

GameCo CEO Blaine Graboyes described the company’s latest games, which he told commissioners will bring younger players into casinos. New entries include “Call of Duty,” “Nothin’ But Net,” “Steve Aoki’s Neon Dream” and “Terminator 2.”

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